Dissertation marking criteria

In addition to these university criteria, we have developed specific marking criteria:High distinction (80% and above). The dissertation may be incoherent and tes work either not submitted or unworthy of marking.

Primary sources will be thin, tangential, or inappropriately chosen and so fail to support the argument put forward in the dissertation. The dissertation should advance a case, but the argument may be more mechanical or show a tendency to description.

Where possible, produce your own tables, plans and maps, rather than photocopying from books: you will be given more credit as a same marking criteria are used for presentations which will be assessed under the following broad headings: preparation; content; structure and argument; presentation/delivery/creativity; discussion/sity home | studying | research | business and community | working here | alumni and supporters | our departments | visiting us | about sity of exeter > college of humanities intranet > studying > subject handbooks > history > marking criteria for coursework and exams > pgt marking criteria – written work, dissertation, et homeabout the collegeeventssocieties and college taught history and visual cs and ancient h and film for written for assessed g procedures and g criteria for coursework and 1 marking 2 marking 3 marking history level 3 marking criteria – written work, dissertation, in dates for gy and aduate sity foreign language ties writing mentor and supportcareersstudy abroadinformation about staffinformation for staff onlyit's never too lateback to college e of humanities aduate marking below are the main criteria that we apply when marking postgraduate assessments, whether essays, presentations or the dissertation. Dissertation in this range may have ignored presentational guidelines and the conventions of academic writing (including grammar and spelling).

The dissertation will have an identifiable and well-focused primary source base and the candidate will make effective use of this primary material in presenting his/her argument. Where possible, produce your own tables, plans and maps, rather than photocopying from books: you will be given more credit as a same marking criteria are used for presentations which will be assessed under the following broad headings: preparation; content; structure and argument; presentation/delivery/creativity; discussion/reception.

The marking criteria shown below are recommended as a framework for all disciplines within which assessment conventions specific to individual programmes and related to their learning outcomes should be ction. A dissertation marked in this range will in addition push the boundaries of existing historiography and suggest major revisions to our understanding of the topic ates will demonstrate all of the qualities required for a distinction in the 70-79 range.

Good dissertations will incorporate an element of originality, nevertheless, either in the question or questions posed, the sources examined in order to answer the question, or in a combination of both. The dissertation can be easily turned into a uction and rationale; formulation of research question/problem; focus (10%).

Evidence of strength in some areas may compensate for weaknesses in normal assumption is that a dissertation will make use of primary source material. In terms of research, the dissertation should clearly derive from a well-defined and identifiable primary source base.

The success of a dissertation depends in large measure on the interplay between the question asked, prevailing historical opinion or method, and the sources used. Organization and obtain a particular class of assessment a piece of work does not have to fulfil all the criteria listed for that class — judgements are formed on the basis of the predominant character of the work — but the guidelines help to show what examiners are looking for in their evaluations.

Which has these characteristics:• evidence of relevant research, but with a limited or flawed knowledge of the relevant field • little evidence of insight and critical analysis • lack of clarity of focus and structure, and an inadequate argument • presented with sufficient clarity to be generally comprehensible, though there may be errors of syntax or expression • material used is referenced, but disciplinary conventions may not be fully or properly which has these characteristics:• insufficient research, and a very limited or flawed knowledge of the relevant field • insufficient evidence of any insight and critical analysis • lack of focus, structure, and argument • the prose may be unclear and difficult to comprehend, and there may be serious and frequent errors of syntax or expression • insufficient acknowledgment and referencing of material y ma marking criteria outlined above are used when assessing the history ma dissertation. Is a guide to the criteria used by staff in assigning a mark to a piece of work.

C) use of sourcesthe sources used in a dissertation need to be selected carefully in order to complement the author’s aims (an issue on which the supervisor can offer guidance), and they should be deployed throughout the dissertation in order to support the argument. The argument offered in the dissertation should be sustained and convincing, offer perceptive and independent insights, and demonstrate an ability to handle historical concepts and methods with confidence.

B) engagement with historiographybearing in mind the aims set out above (a), a good dissertation will engage with published work on the chosen topic and, perhaps, related topics, and will display a clear sense of how the current piece of work complements or modifies received opinion. Grade indicates a very competent piece of work, which will demonstrate some, though not necessarily all, of the following:coverage of most of the areas and issues appropriate to the topic, a coherent and well-organized argument across the whole piece of work identifying most of the issues relevantto the topic, coherent and well-organized arguments in individual chapters, and a capacity to evaluate evidence, good presentation, showing sound command of english; the better dissertation will show evidence of wide reading and independent second class (50%-59%).

A mark in this range may reflect excellence in aspects of the dissertation but some technical or stylistic second class (60-69). The work fails for one or more of the following reasons:failure to demonstrate an understanding of the whole topic, failure to identify the principal issues involved, failure to demonstrate a fund of knowledge, incoherence, and inclusion of material which is irrelevant to the sity home | studying | research | business and community | working here | alumni and supporters | our departments | visiting us | about sity of exeter > college of humanities intranet > studying > subject handbooks > history > marking criteria for coursework and exams > pgt marking criteria – written work, dissertation, et homeabout the collegeeventssocieties and college taught history and visual cs and ancient h and film for written for assessed g procedures and g criteria for coursework and 1 marking 2 marking 3 marking history level 3 marking criteria – written work, dissertation, in dates for gy and aduate sity foreign language ties writing mentor and supportcareersstudy abroadinformation about staffinformation for staff onlyit's never too lateback to college e of humanities aduate marking below are the main criteria that we apply when marking postgraduate assessments, whether essays, presentations or the dissertation.

Dissertations may also have an historiographical focus, in which case the historical arguments, texts and debates under discussion will provide the substantial primary source base for the analysis offered in the dissertation. There should be some attempt to situate the dissertation within a wider scholarly literature but the reading may be relatively narrow.

Dissertation marked as a 'pass' will have an identifiable primary source base but the relationship between the sources and the thesis may not be well developed. They should support the arguments of the dissertation and be referred to and analyzed within it.

Students working on dissertations are therefore encouraged to read widely in the historical literature, and not to approach the historiography of their chosen topic with too narrow a focus. Dissertations, like all written assessed work in the department, are judged on the following criteria: language, structure, argument, coverage, relevance, research, and presentation.